Researchers and Affiliated Researchers

lisa-profile

Biographical Information

Lisa Thompson is Professor and Director at the African Centre for Citizenship and Democracy at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. Aside from teaching Global Political Economics at masters and doctoral level, Lisa works on activist, action based research projects that link case study work on development to critical global political economy analyses. Lisa’s current field research is on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) mega-projects in the Global South (especially those funded by the China). Lisa’s research also focuses on the current development policy resurgence towards elevating the role of Special Economic Zones (SEZs) as critical to development in the South to “catch up” with the North. SEZs and export led growth strategies that rely on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) often highlight local employment creation and technological innovation which are all seen as critical in the context of the trending 4th Industrial Revolution focus globally.

Lisa’s research on development in BRICS and the global South links global and local debates on development to the realities of marginalised communities. Lisa is currently working on a long term research project that highlights the need for socio-ecological transformation in the Global South in relation to the BRICS and G20 multilateral platforms. Lisa’s research is located in the current global political economy context of the Global South development debate. Fieldwork focuses on the dominant policy narrative in both the North and South on stimulating Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), through mega-projects, tax incentives to foreign companies (and in South Africa, the creation of SEZs for special tax incentives).  ACCEDEs Research Project through Friedrich Ebert Stiftung funding in South Africa aims to build a comparative dimension to the project, examining Global South development debate convergences and divergences. The activist based, fieldwork orientated research highlights the changing nature of the global political economy and new challenges facing workers and activists in their struggles for livelihood rights in the BRICS and Global South.

Recent Publications Include

Thompson, L. 2019. BRICS Civil Society Initiatives: Towards the Inclusion of Affected Communities and Collective Development? Third World Thematics, online Third World Quarterly Journal(special edition Affectedness in Global Governance and International Law), Vol 3, No 6.

Thompson, L. Tapscott, C. Tsolekile de Wet, P, 2018. “An Exploration of the Concept of Community and its Impact on Participatory Governance Policy and Service Delivery in Poor Areas of Cape Town, South Africa”, Politikon, Vol 44, No 4. 

Thompson, L and Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2017. BRICS Development Strategies: Exploring the meaning of BRICS ‘community’ and ‘collective action’ in the Context of BRICS State Led Cooperation in South Africa, Chinese Political Science Review, Vol 2, No 1.

Thompson, L and Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2017. BRICS Development Strategies: Exploring the meaning of BRICS ‘community’ and ‘collective action’ in the Context of BRICS State Led Cooperation in South Africa, Chinese Political Science Review, Vol 2, No 1 (peer reviewed).

Thompson, L. Tapscott, C. Tsolekile de Wet, P, 2017. “An Exploration of the Concept of Community and its Impact on Participatory Governance Policy and Service Delivery in Poor Areas of Cape Town, South Africa”, Politikon, Vol 44, No 4 (online) (peer reviewed).

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Pamela

Biographical Information

Pamela Tsolekile de Wet is a researcher at the Centre for Citizenship and Democracy (ACCEDE), School of Government, at the University of the Western Cape (UWC).

She obtained her Masters in Urban Design and Infrastructure Management at UCT in 2012 and is currently registered for a PhD in the Institute of Social Development at UWC.  Her research interests include people-centred development processes, democracy, and citizen participation.  She is currently involved in a research project BRICS from below – Social Justice, Sustainable Development and Quality of Life Cluster.

Her recent publications & conference papers include:

  • Thompson, L., Conradie, I & Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2014. Participatory Politics: Understanding Civil Society Organisation in Governance networks in Khayelitsha, Politikon SA Journal of Political Studies Vol. 41, No. 3, pp. XXX
  • Jacobs, Jordhus- Lier, Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2015. The Politics of Knowledge: Knowledge management in Informal Settlements Upgrading in Cape Town. Urban Forum (2015), Vol. 26, No. 4, pp. 425 – 441.
  • Jordhus, – Lier, D & Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2016. The Politics of Slums in the Global South – Settlement Stories: A question of knowledge.  Routledge, (2016) p.79: urban informality in Brazil, India, South Africa and Peru.
  • Thompson, L & Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2016. BRICS Development Strategies: Exploring the meaning of BRICS ‘community’ and ‘collective action’ in the Context of BRICS State Led Cooperation in South Africa at the International Symposium on Development and Governance in the BRICS, 24-25 September 2016, Fudan University, Shanghai.
  • Tsolekile-de Wet, P. & Thompson, L. 2016. The Role of Social Movements in Making Local Government Decision-Making Processes More Inclusive – A case study of Sivukile Sonele Social Movement in Langa, Cape Town, Draft paper presented at the Association of South African schools and Departments of Public Administration (ASSADPAM)Annual Conference October 26-27 2016, Cape Town
  • Thompson,L., Tapscott, C & Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2017. An exploration of the concept of Community & its impact on Participatory Governance Policy & service delivery in poor areas of Cape Town. Politikon South African Journal of Political Studies, 2017
  • Thompson, L. Tsolekile de Wet, P. 2017. BRICS Development Strategies “collective action in the context of BRICS State –led cooperation in South Africa. Politikon South African Journal of Political Studies, 2017, Vol, 0, ISS, 0.
Franklin

Biographical Information

Franklin, Ondah Awaseh is a researcher at the African Centre for Citizenship and Democracy(ACCEDE). Mr. Awaseh is currently doing research work on BRICS from below (significance and understanding of the BRICS alliance for ordinary citizens) in partnership with other senior researchers from ACCEDE, while completing a master dissertation that interrogates the peculiarity of Special Economic Zones (SEZ) in adding value to the Development Agenda in South Africa.

Franklin’s orientation towards research developed when he was a research assistant at the School of Post Graduate studies(UWC), where he worked mostly with PhD students. He has also mentored and tutored academic writing and research to several undergraduate students at UWC both as a senior mentor/tutor and as a Residential Service’s Student Development Officer.

Franklin’s academic and leadership quality earned him a number of awards with the most memorable being UWC’s Deputy Vice Chancellor (DVC) Student Development and Support (SDS) most outstanding student of the year.

chris

Biographical Information

Chris Tapscott is an Emeritus Professor and former director of the School of Government at the University of the Western Cape. A sociologist, he has, over the years, undertaken extensive research on behalf of ACCEDE on issues relating to citizenship, participatory democracy and social exclusion, social movements, and the limitations of the local state. Recent work has focused on the prospects of a democratic developmental state, and on issues of governance and accountability in BRICS states. Recent publications include:

  • Tapscott, C. Halvorsen, T. and Cruz‐Del Rosario, T. (2018) (eds.). The Democratic Development State: North South Perspectives. Ibidem, Stuttgart.
  • Steiner, R., Navarro, C., Kaiser, C., and Tapscott C., (2018). “Is local always better? Strengths and limitations of local governance for service delivery”. International Journal of Public Service Management, Vol. 31, No. 4.
  • Thompson, L., Tapscott, C. and Tsolekile, P. (2017) “An Exploration of the Concept of Community and its Impact on Participatory Governance Policy and Service Delivery in Poor Areas of Cape Town, South Africa”. Politikon. Vol. 44. No. 2.
  • Tapscott, C. (2017) “South Africa in the Twenty First Century – Governance Challenges in the Struggle for Social Equity and Economic Growth”. Chinese Political Science Review. Vol 2. No. 1.
  • Tapscott, C. (2016) “Participate or be Punished – Administrative Responses to Protest” in Klassen, T., Cepiku, D. and Lah, T (eds.), Handbook of Global Public Policy and Administration. (Routledge).
patrick-profile

Biographical Information

As Distinguished Professor of Political Economy at the Wits School of Governance, Patrick Bond’s work is presently focused on global economy, geopolitics, local and global political ecology, and South African, Zimbabwean, African, BRICS and global uneven development. Since moving permanently to South Africa in 1990, he has written numerous books about global governance, national public policy, urban problems and environmental stresses, especially climate change. In service to the new South African government from 1994-2002, Patrick authored/edited more than a dozen policy papers, including the Reconstruction and Development Programme and the RDP White Paper.

From 2004-16, he was director of the University of KwaZulu-Natal Centre for Civil Society.Patrick earned his doctorate in economic geography under the supervision of David Harvey at Johns Hopkins University (1985-92), and has an undergraduate economics degree from Swarthmore College (Philadelphia, 1979-83).

IMG_0961

Biographical Information

Ms Thecla Mulu is completing a PHD at the African Centre for Citizenship and Democracy, School of Government, University of the Western Cape. Her thesis is titled: The South African AIDS movement and local responses to health activism: implications for citizenship and democracy.

She holds an MA in Development Studies from the Institute of Social Development (ISD) at the University of the Western Cape, and a BA(Hons) from the African Centre for Migration and Society(ACMS) at the University of the Witwatersrand.

Her recent publications include:

Thecla N. Mulu & Ernest A. Pineteh (2016): Approaches to participatory community development in South Africa for small business development. Loyola Journal of Social Sciences, 30 (1): 7-28. IBSSErnest A. Pineteh & Thecla N. Mulu (2016): Tragic and heroic moments in the lives of forced migrants: memories of political asylum seekers in post-apartheid South Africa. Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, 32 (3): 63-72. IBSS

Ernest A. Pineteh & Thecla N. Mulu (2016): Francophone transnational students, social exclusion and the challenges of adaptation at a South African University of Technology. African Human Mobility Review, 2 (1): 383-403. Peer reviewed